Meaning of Sunflowers

Sunflowers grow quickly throughout the American Midwest.

Sunflowers grow quickly throughout the American Midwest.

Sunflowers are a cheerful addition to any cut flower bouquet, bringing a bit of summer's warmth to your table all year long. The most common sunflowers have vivid golden yellow petals and reddish brown centers. While you can opt to give sunflowers for their beauty, sunflowers -- like most cut flowers -- have a traditional meaning in the language of flowers.

Adoration

A bouquet of cut sunflowers can be used to signify adoration. While flower meanings typically have no basis in fact, this traditional meaning is rooted in the heliotropic behavior of the young sunflowers. Like other heliotropic flowers, the sunflower orients itself toward the sun each day. You might consider giving sunflowers for Mother's Day, birthdays or anytime you want to show someone how much you care.

Haughtiness

Sunflowers can grow up to 12 inches in a single 24-hour period, faster than nearly any other flower. Because of their speedy growth, these blossoms have been associated with haughtiness or blatant pride. Fortunately, this negative meaning is not well-known, and you can send sunflowers without concern about offending the recipient.

The Sun

Before the conquest of the Americas, the Inca Indians used the sunflower as a symbol of the sun. Gold was molded into the shape of sunflowers to form necklaces for priestesses in religious rituals. Today, we still consider the sunflower a symbol of warmth, the summer sun and good cheer. A bouquet of sunflowers can brighten a dreary day or bring a bit of sunlight into a hospital room.

Congratulations

When you need to send a happy, positive message, a bouquet of sunflowers is ideal. Sunflowers have large, bold blooms and make a big impact with only a few simple stems in a vase on their own or in a larger bouquet combined with other bright flowers. Send sunflowers to celebrate a graduation, job promotion or personal achievement.

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  • sunflowers image by john barber from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

 


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